Flashback Connection: Layla

August 20, 2008 at 3:05 am (music) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Layla by Derek and the Dominos featuring Eric Clapton and Duane Allman on guitar in 1970 is one of my favorite songs. It was recently ranked number 13 on Rolling Stone’s 100 greatest guitar songs.  It’s a sad love song based on a Persian story by Nezami about the unrequited love between Layla and Majnun. Clapton had seen himself as Majnun who had gone crazy because the girl he loved married another.  He had an unrequited love (at the time) to George Harrison’s wife.  The song itself is so beautiful and sad.  The guitars seem to be crying which ironically Clapton had befriended Harrison while working on While My Guitar Gently Weeps which is number 7 on the rolling stones list.

It’s good to be well rounded.  It can help write or understand songs among other things. 

So here are the lyrics:

What’ll you do when you get lonely
And nobody’s waiting by your side?
You’ve been running and hiding much too long.
You know it’s just your foolish pride.

Layla, you’ve got me on my knees.
Layla, I’m begging, darling please.
Layla, darling won’t you ease my worried mind.

I tried to give you consolation
When your old man had let you down.
Like a fool, I fell in love with you,
Turned my whole world upside down.

Chorus

Let’s make the best of the situation
Before I finally go insane.
Please don’t say we’ll never find a way
And tell me all my love’s in vain.

Chorus

Chorus

Kagehime

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The Blood of Flowers

July 29, 2008 at 10:59 pm (books) (, , , , , , )

I really enjoyed the book, The Blood of Flowers by  Anita Amirrezvani. This story that takes place in the 17thcentury Persia was powerfully written.  The narrator who is never named (in tribute to a tale) struggles to both find herself and survive in a world that doesn’t have a place for women as individuals.  A woman is not expected to have anything or be anything without a male relation. When her father dies her world changes to the worse. Amirrevani  inter-weaves tales written like and based on spoken aloud ones into the story like the rugs that narrator so admires. 

The narrator, who as I mentioned before is not named, realizes in the story that her name will never be put on a rug to be remembered for all time, but that her rug will be remembered and make people happy who have them.  This is the story of many women, but the narrator is the rare person who realizes her own significance although people keep suggesting otherwise.

It took the author nine years to write this book and I’m glad she stuck with it.  I definitely recommend this book.  It is full of the depth, beauty, and contradictions of Iran.

Kagehime

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